Privacy Policy

Who we are

Our website address is: https://carolmehlman.com.

What personal data we collect and why we collect it

Comments

When visitors leave comments on the site we collect the data shown in the comments form, and also the visitor’s IP address and browser user agent string to help spam detection.

An anonymized string created from your email address (also called a hash) may be provided to the Gravatar service to see if you are using it. The Gravatar service privacy policy is available here: https://automattic.com/privacy/. After approval of your comment, your profile picture is visible to the public in the context of your comment.

Media

If you upload images to the website, you should avoid uploading images with embedded location data (EXIF GPS) included. Visitors to the website can download and extract any location data from images on the website.

Contact forms

Cookies

If you leave a comment on our site you may opt-in to saving your name, email address and website in cookies. These are for your convenience so that you do not have to fill in your details again when you leave another comment. These cookies will last for one year.

If you have an account and you log in to this site, we will set a temporary cookie to determine if your browser accepts cookies. This cookie contains no personal data and is discarded when you close your browser.

When you log in, we will also set up several cookies to save your login information and your screen display choices. Login cookies last for two days, and screen options cookies last for a year. If you select “Remember Me”, your login will persist for two weeks. If you log out of your account, the login cookies will be removed.

If you edit or publish an article, an additional cookie will be saved in your browser. This cookie includes no personal data and simply indicates the post ID of the article you just edited. It expires after 1 day.

Embedded content from other websites

Articles on this site may include embedded content (e.g. videos, images, articles, etc.). Embedded content from other websites behaves in the exact same way as if the visitor has visited the other website.

These websites may collect data about you, use cookies, embed additional third-party tracking, and monitor your interaction with that embedded content, including tracking your interaction with the embedded content if you have an account and are logged in to that website.

Analytics

Who we share your data with

How long we retain your data

If you leave a comment, the comment and its metadata are retained indefinitely. This is so we can recognize and approve any follow-up comments automatically instead of holding them in a moderation queue.

For users that register on our website (if any), we also store the personal information they provide in their user profile. All users can see, edit, or delete their personal information at any time (except they cannot change their username). Website administrators can also see and edit that information.

What rights you have over your data

If you have an account on this site, or have left comments, you can request to receive an exported file of the personal data we hold about you, including any data you have provided to us. You can also request that we erase any personal data we hold about you. This does not include any data we are obliged to keep for administrative, legal, or security purposes.

Where we send your data

Visitor comments may be checked through an automated spam detection service.

Privacy Policy: GDPR

This web app privacy policy, complies with data protection legislation, and has been updated for the General Data Protection Regulation (also known as the GDPR).

This policy covers the following matters (amongst others): the collection of personal information; the use of that personal information; the legal bases for the processing of that information; disclosures of that personal information to third parties; international transfers of personal information; and the use of cookies on the website.

This document might not be suitable for you if the ways in which you use personal information are complex or unusual.

There are many aspects to data protection compliance. Publishing a privacy policy or statement containing the relevant information is only one aspect albeit an important aspect of compliance.

Section 1.2

“Personal data” is defined in Article 4(1) of the GDPR:

“(1) ‘personal data’ means any information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person (‘data subject’); an identifiable natural person is one who can be identified, directly or indirectly, in particular by reference to an identifier such as a name, an identification number, location data, an online identifier or to one or more factors specific to the physical, physiological, genetic, mental, economic, cultural or social identity of that natural person”.

Section 1.3

Optional element.

The inclusion of this statement in your privacy policy will not in itself satisfy the requirements of the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003 as regards consent to the use of cookies. Guidance concerning methods of obtaining such consent is included on the Information Commissioner’s website (http://www.ico.gov.uk).

Section 3: How we use your personal data

Article 13(1) of the GDPR provides that:

“(1) Where personal data relating to a data subject are collected from the data subject, the controller shall, at the time when personal data are obtained, provide the data subject with all of the following information: … (c) the purposes of the processing for which the personal data are intended as well as the legal basis for the processing; (d) where the processing is based on point (f) of Article 6(1), the legitimate interests pursued by the controller or by a third party”.

Article 6(1)(f) of the GDPR provides that:

“(1) Processing shall be lawful only if and to the extent that at least one of the following applies: … (f) processing is necessary for the purposes of the legitimate interests pursued by the controller or by a third party, except where such interests are overridden by the interests or fundamental rights and freedoms of the data subject which require protection of personal data, in particular where the data subject is a child.”

Section 3.1

Article 14 of the GDPR, which applies where personal information is not obtained from the data subject, provides that information about “the categories of personal data concerned” must be supplied to data subjects.

Article 13 of the GDPR, which applies where personal information is obtained from the data subject, does not include an equivalent provision.

Nonetheless, we have included references to general categories of data in this document, because this facilitates the identification of particular purposes of processing and the legal bases of processing – information which does need to be provided under Article 13.

Section 4: Providing your personal data to others

Article 13(1)(e) of the GDPR requires that where personal data are collected from the data subject, the data controller must provide the data subject with information about “the recipients or categories of recipients of the personal data”.

Equivalent rules for data collected from someone other than the data subject are in Article 14(1)(e).

Section 5: International transfers of your personal data

Article 13(1)(f) of the GDPR requires that data controllers disclose to data subjects “where applicable, the fact that the controller intends to transfer personal data to a third country or international organisation and the existence or absence of an adequacy decision by the Commission, or in the case of transfers referred to in Article 46 [transfers subject to appropriate safeguards] or 47 [binding corporate rules], or the second subparagraph of Article 49(1) [limited transfers for compelling legitimate interests], reference to the appropriate or suitable safeguards and the means by which to obtain a copy of them or where they have been made available”.

Section 6: Retaining and deleting personal data

Article 5(1)(e) of the GDPR sets out the storage limitation, one of the fundamental rules of the regime:

“Personal data shall be: … kept in a form which permits identification of data subjects for no longer than is necessary for the purposes for which the personal data are processed; personal data may be stored for longer periods insofar as the personal data will be processed solely for archiving purposes in the public interest, scientific or historical research purposes or statistical purposes in accordance with Article 89(1) subject to implementation of the appropriate technical and organisational measures required by this Regulation in order to safeguard the rights and freedoms of the data subject … “.

Section 8: Your rights

Article 13(2) of the GDPR provides that, where personal data is collected from a data subject, certain information about data subject rights must be provided:

“In addition to the information referred to in paragraph 1, the controller shall, at the time when personal data are obtained, provide the data subject with the following further information necessary to ensure fair and transparent processing: … (b) the existence of the right to request from the controller access to and rectification or erasure of personal data or restriction of processing concerning the data subject or to object to processing as well as the right to data portability; (c) where the processing is based on point (a) of Article 6(1) or point (a) of Article 9(2), the existence of the right to withdraw consent at any time, without affecting the lawfulness of processing based on consent before its withdrawal; …”.

Similar provisions are set out in Article 14 in relation to personal data which is not collected from the relevant data subject.

Section 8.3

The right to access is set out in Article 15 of the GDPR.

Section 8.4

The right to rectification is set out in Article 16 of the GDPR.

Section 8.5

The right to erasure (or right to be forgotten) is set out in Article 17 of the GDPR, and must be notified to data subjects under Articles 13(2)(b), 14(2)(c) and 15(1)(e) of the GDPR.

Consider modifying the highlighted circumstances and exclusions, depending upon what will be most relevant to your processing.

Section 8.6

Article 18(1) of the GDPR states:

“The data subject shall have the right to obtain from the controller restriction of processing where one of the following applies: (a) the accuracy of the personal data is contested by the data subject, for a period enabling the controller to verify the accuracy of the personal data; (b) the processing is unlawful and the data subject opposes the erasure of the personal data and requests the restriction of their use instead; (c) the controller no longer needs the personal data for the purposes of the processing, but they are required by the data subject for the establishment, exercise or defense of legal claims; (d) the data subject has objected to processing pursuant to Article 21(1) pending the verification whether the legitimate grounds of the controller override those of the data subject.

Section 8.7

The right to object to processing is detailed in Article 21 of the GDPR, and must be notified to data subjects under Articles 21(4), 13(2)(b) and 14(2)(c).

Article 21(3) of the GDPR states:

“Where the data subject objects to processing for direct marketing purposes, the personal data shall no longer be processed for such purposes.”

Section 8.9

This right is set out in Article 21(6) of the GDPR.

Section 8.10

The right to data portability is set out in full in Article 20 of the GDPR, and must be notified to data subjects under Articles 13(2)(b) and 14(2)(c).

Section 8.11

The right to lodge a complaint with a supervisory authority is set out in Article 77 of the GDPR, and must be notified to data subjects under Articles 13(2)(d), 14(2)(e) and 15(1)(f).

Section 8.12

Article 7(3) of the GDPR sets out the right of withdrawal. The right must be notified to data subjects under Articles 13(2)(c) and 14(2)(d). See also Article 17(1)(b).

Section 11: Cookies used by our service providers

Does the website serve any third party cookies, analytics cookies or tracking cookies to users?

Section 11.3

Optional element. Will Google AdSense advertisements be published on the website?

This provision should be included if you publish Google AdSense interest-based advertisements on your website. Additional disclosures will be required if you have not opted out of third-party ad serving.

If the website sets any other cookies to users’ machines that track behaviour, information about those cookies will also need to be disclosed.

Section 13: Our details

UK companies must provide their corporate names, their registration numbers, their place of registration and their registered office address on their websites (although not necessarily in this document).

Sole traders and partnerships that carry on a business in the UK under a “business name” (i.e. a name which is not the name of the trader/names of the partners or certain other specified classes of name) must also make certain website disclosures: (i) in the case of a sole trader, the individual’s name; (ii) in the case of a partnership, the name of each member of the partnership; and (iii) in either case, in relation to each person named, an address in the UK at which service of any document relating in any way to the business will be effective. All websites covered by the Electronic Commerce (EC Directive) Regulations 2002 must provide a geographic address (not a PO Box number) and an email address. All website operators covered by the Provision of Services Regulations 2009 must also provide a telephone number.